About your Search

20121201
20121231
STATION
CSPAN2 27
CSPAN 20
CNNW 15
CNBC 11
MSNBCW 8
KQED (PBS) 4
CNN 3
KRCB (PBS) 3
KGO (ABC) 2
KPIX (CBS) 2
WJLA (ABC) 2
WMAR (ABC) 2
FBC 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 117
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 120 (some duplicates have been removed)
're looking at relatively flattish trade here in europe on christmas eve. let's recap off of what we've seen in asia in the overnight session here. you're looking at slight gains across the board. the shanghai composite up by .25%. you're seeing similar gains in the s&p asx and the hang seng, the kospi both a couple of points up to the upside, as well. currency markets, pretty stable trade, too. we're seeing slightly lower volumes to say the least as you would anticipate here during the holiday days. we are, though, flirt, a recent high is 1.32. a couple of sessions ago, we were down at the 1.29 mark. aussie/dollar flat. sterling seeing slight gains. just to wrap things up showing you what's taking place in fixed income, relatively flattish trade, as well. the yield here on the spanish yield, 5.3%. the uk seeing yeldz slightly higher, as well. but, of course, it is christmas. it is the holiday season that we're up against. so you would anticipate that maybe some investor res closing out recent profits. sitting tight and waiting for that next year to start, karen. >> thanks very much, louisa.
league in europe. combined with steadily rising television rights, they have made a solid foundation for german soccer. the only thing missing is that elusive european title. >> we hope they get it. if you are just joining us, you are watching the "journal" coming to you from dw in berlin. after a short break, we will take a look of the role of german chancellor angela merkel in solving the eurozone debt crisis. >> we will be right back. do not go away. >> welcome back. >> 2012 is coming to an end, and a lot of people in europe will be happy to see the old year out. not a day went by without worrying about the future of europe. >> not just for finance experts. a to was also a tough year for political leaders as they lurch from one crisis summit to another, spending -- spending long as wrangling over the best strategy to solve europe cozy financial crisis. >> as europe's biggest economy, germany naturally had a large say. >> as germany's leader, angela merkel naturally made sure her voice was heard. >> she's the most powerful woman in europe. all eyes were on chancellor and to merkel
. as america stood on the edge of american leadership, europe entered a decade in which it convinced itself war was impossible. the book, grand illusion, captured the view that europeans were too advanced, too sophisticated to fight each other. john maynard keynes a code this with his famous observation about how the world was tied together, how an englishman could order from his doorstep products from faraway lands and have them delivered to him. it's kind of an early version of thomas friedman's theory which claims an advanced country that used computers won't go to war with each other. i call it the starbucks to pick any two countries that have starbucks won't fight. you know, i guess unless they have like a triple espresso to another observer, in a much different way, posited that war would be so bloody and weaponry so deadly that no one would dare risk a conflict. all of these assume that european leaders would be rational, a stretch even in the present day. this, of course, vanished in august 1914, a war sparked by one of the most unlikely of accident when ferdinand on his way back from s
on the fiscal cliff. equities falling on wednesday in the u.s. on thursday when we opened here in europe, yesterday we saw a relatively stable markets. we closed out on a flat to slightly higher note for most of our european markets yesterday. this morning coming into trade, we're pretty flat. we've taken a bit of a dropdown on this drop but we're just a couple of points lower. in the asian session overnight, we managed to see gains back again. they lost again on the notion of the fiscal cliff not happening. shanghai composite higher by just over 1% in today's session. hang seng, and the kospi closing slightly higher across the board. the european markets mixed, but the ftse 100 still flat to higher. we're all looking towards these fiscal cliff negotiations. at the moment, we've got a couple more days of trade before we get to the end of the new year, as well. most analysts out there, they've been saying we're going to see a relatively flattish end to the year from where we are now given that we've seen such an increase of equities in the past 12 months. we've seen stellar outperformance
for the economy. and the transaction tax is being taken very seriously in europe and probably will happen there, even though the u.k. is kicking and screaming because they specialize in being the home of trading, whether trading in stocks or derivatives or anything else. they simply do not want that to be taxed. there are people in congress. i think wall street is now the number-one contributor to political campaigns. at least, it is in the running for number-one. i have been to washington many times and i'm involved with several groups that are trying to reform the business sector so that it can work, so that it can survive. it is very difficult because of the sheer amount of money that the finance sector in particular is pouring into lobbying and campaign contributions. it is very difficult. >> let's give a round of applause for lin. -- lynn. [applause] there is an opportunity for you to purchase and have the but signed. if you have court-further questions, she will be here signing books. thank you all and have a safe trip home. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [caption
that they're seeing in europe enough to keep them above the pencil line. >> what we've seen so far with today's numbers is exports are declining very sharp. they'll need asia and the u.s. to offset some of that demand weakness, but again, the biggest market for most is the euro zone. if the eurozone is performing badly, that will have a thok-on effect for those countries. >> there's a number of strategists saying after the u.s. has sort of led equities for most of the year, they're now saying europe is the place to be. from i think really the question you have to ask yourself is when cash, equities, credit, government bonds, where do you want to be. and equity in my mind mind is absolutely not. you need good growth numbers to justify the equity markets going up. now, i think there's a lot of investors looking at the yields on ghoechlt bonds or credits and that's motivating them to move into equity. i think the numbers are actually going to be relatively small. and i would certainly advocate against doing that because as you were saying, weak numbers, unless you see some much strong
previously thought, although the session still looks very much on course for another quarter here for europe. the pmi will rise above 50 that divides growth between contraction. hasn't stopped the euro/dollar from hitting a one and a half month high. i suppose we know growth is going to be anemic, but if spanish banks are getting some money, are we feeling slightly better? >> that's what euro trades on, isn't it? pmis are all very interesting for the economist. but they want bigger stories. most of the news flow, it's helpful to the euro. people have been trying to affect this rally for a while. we are close to those october highs. the news flow has been good, i would say. >> we hit, what, nearly 131.80? >> before that, we go 131.40. the enthusiasm for euro is surprisingly good. we're surprised by how far this rally has gone on pretty thin news sometimes. >> i just want to recap what we've got. eurozone finance ministers meeting in brussels. an agreement still seems pretty elusive at this moment. germany and french finance ministers have very different views about oversight of banks. and in
you very much. a key session in japan overnight. >>> as we pivot our focus to europe, you see stocks addi adding .3%. consistent with the rally we've seen over the last several trading sessions and apparently having plenty to do with the possible resolution of u.s. fiscal talks. we'll have more in a little bit. the survey also helping to lift sentiment or keep it buoyant. look at the major borses. green in the harder hit regions. ftse mib, spain up better than 1%. consistent with the rally we saw yesterday. remarkable. the xetra dax adding .1%. for its part, up to close to 30% this year. the ftse 100 adding .3. the bond space, we'll look at that and talk later about the big trades that have helped some hedge funds, for example, when it comes to greek debt. for the time being, mario's comments this summer is have techively kept the bond gleelds a tight range since then six months or so now, this is going. and differentiation across the space where italy price rising, not the case for spain which is seeing its yield up to 5.3. and i know we haven't mentioned this in a while, but i want
movement in europe. capitalism has always been recycling. the process of described is a process whereby the entrepreneur is now forced to be an entrepreneur. the ex-peasants, they did not choose to be entrepreneurs. they had to be. they used debt. bringing it to the present, energizing the production process, producing the wealth from which he hopes that he will be able to repay the debt. the moneylenders, later the bankers. cover for the fact that he had paid wages for capital goods. hoping there is something left for him, for profit. debt is all about intertemporal recycling. by effectively taking his hand and pushing it into the future, grabbing value that had not been generated. -- that is debt. producing the wealth, from which they hoped they would pay the debt. moneylenders, bankers. covering the fact that he had already paid wages, hoping that there would be something less for -- left for him. the fact that there is recycling -- you take a value for the future, bring it into the present, so as to develop -- delivered the body to the future. the problem with this process is once y
to society? it is very difficult to give any sort of charity for any charitable purposes in europe. it is very difficult to give service in europe. when i was asking people, they said, why would we serve? there is a bureau for that. there are some places in europe burk it is illegal to give volunteer service. as i see the united states going in the same trend of all sourcing -- outsourcing, it is so overregulated and so over controlling of your life, it takes away your freedom to even support yourself, how would you propose the government relinquished power is that it has taken over peacefully? how do you think the government would be able to let go of this control of our lives? >> i agree with every syllable you just said. [laughter] you almost provoked me to be more political than i felt comfortable doing in this chapel. leave more space, more breathing room for civil society. this astonishing combustion of voluntary association. in my remarks, i used the analogy of a tree. in the shade of which, smaller things cannot grow. that is the danger of an excess of state. >> [inaudible]
. >>> and the next phase of europe's crisis. which nations might find themselves split apart. i'll explain. >>> first, here is my take. arafat's body has been exhumed for investigation. bringing back memories of the unpredictable palestinian leader. the news broke at a time when a conventional wisdom has begun to take hold that the middle east today is much more dangerous, unstable, violent and anti-american than before. let's take a look at facts. in the 1980s the newly empowered radical islamic republic of iran unsettled the region with its promise to spread its revolution elsewhere. lebanon was in the midst of a bloody civil war. that engulfed itself and the palestinians and israel. iran and iraq fought a gruesome war with over one million casualties. hezbollah attacked u.s. armed forces directly forcing a humiliating withdrawal from lebanon. a cia station chief was tortured and killed, and u.s. secrets and interests compromised, and that was just in one decade. or consider those days from israel's point of view. during the 1980s, jerusalem faced well arms regimes. leading members of the rejection
keeps rates unchanged. europe continues to hang in there economically. >> and nat gas gets a boost. the government finds exporting it is better than keeping it here at home. >> apple as we mentioned in the spotlight today, shares of the tech giant coming off their worst day in four years, sliding back into bear market territory. the one day loss erased nearly $35 billion in market cap. that chunk is bigger than 400 other s&p 500 companies. apple ceo tim cook talked to nbc's brian williams in our rock center exclusive. >> why can't you be a made in america company? >> you know, this i found, as a matter of fact, the engine in here is made in america. and not only are the engines in here made in america, but engines are made in america and are exported. the glass on this phone is made in kentucky. so we have been working for years on doing more and more in the united states, next year, we will do one of our existing mac lines in the united states. >> you can see the entire interview with tim cook tonight on rock center, that's 10:00 eastern time on your local nbc station, but for now
the atlantic between them. he would go off to europe in the spring and summer with a party of friends and travel around, often--sometimes he would take one of his daughters, and then later, he would take a mistress. and when he came back from europe, he would send his wife abroad in the fall and winter with one of their daughters and a chauffeur and a paid companion. so pretty much, they lived separate lives after about 1880. c-span: did they ever divorce? >> guest: no. divorce was really not an option in that world. some people did, but it was very scandalous and shocking. and interestingly enough, it was always--the women were--it was more disruptive for the woman. women were objects of scandal, even if they had done nothing wrong. and a couple of the people the morgans knew who d--women who did get divorced, moved to europe, just because it was a much more accepting, forgiving society. and also, i think, in professional terms, morgan was a conservative banker with a reputation for integrity. divorce didn't figure into that picture. c-span: this picture right here is of which woman
normally on boosting growth. >>> well, it's been a rel ofly good year for stocks in europe. adding about .3%. advancers mostly outpacing decliners on the index this morning. if we can zero in on the bourses, it's largely green behind me. the fits fits mib is atting .6%. the ibex in spain, up 0.8%. and the ftse up about 0.3%. now, some company-specific news this morning, fin mechanica saying shares up 2.4%. this on news they're set to buy sge-avio. safran is also a company considering that change. let's take a quick look at the bond space. we'll get a sense of the kind of trade we're seeing shaping up. it is consistent with flows into the periphery, perhaps out of the core and the risk on move generally that we're seeing this morning. yields up to 4.5 roughly in italy at about 5.4%, respectively. gilt is moving up towards is.9% this morning. the bund yield is still extremely low, so that spread between gilt and bund is widening. look at the euro/dollar. 1 1.3171. extraordinary. we're almost up at that 1.32 level. the dollar/yen is flat, right about 83.88. there we go. a little bit of movemen
idea what he was saying. turner traveled throughout britain and europe. often on foot, carrying a paintbox, he sketched and painted lyrically beautiful landscapes that changed the face of british art. when he died in 1851, he was one of the wealthiest and most famous artists in britain's history. throughout his career, he was always well aware of the key to his success. (reader) "the only secret i have got is damned hard work." (narrator) turner's life and career began in london. by 1788, at the age of 14, j.m.w. turner was apprenticed to an architect as a draftsman. architectural views appeared in his works throughout his life. the next year, turner entered the royal academy of arts school at somerset house. its president, the painter joshua reynolds, endorsed the prevailing view that ranked paintings in a clearly defined hierarchy. history painting was considered the noblest because it could portray events drawn from historical incidents, literature, the bible and mythology. genre painting, scenes from daily life, came next because they also offered examples of virtue to inspi
and nuclear weapons. it will result in weapons ownership. look at europe. look at japan. look at the rest of the world. we are way, way out there. we have the highest murder rate in the world. it hasn't protected us. it has resulted in arguments that should have a consequence of maybe a slap in the face, resulting in a bullet through the heart. it results in a double-murder in this case, a murder/suicide. guns don't protect. they cause suicide. >> let me bring in -- >> they cause suicide? >> i can promise, i'll get back to you, carol. here is what they say to me. i've had it all. but trying to get a debate going. i've been on two years on cnn. in that time, there's been a series of gun rages. each time it is the same debate and nothing gets done about it. 300 million guns and you have between 11,000 and 12,000 guns and murders a year. by comparison, britain has 35 as does germany and australia. japan has one or two. to countries that have strict gun control have very little gun murder. what do you say to americans who say it makes me feel safe? >> i think carole had it right. she said it
. the seven years war changed the map of the world shifting national borders in europe, in africa, in india, and elsewhere. it leveled thousands of towns and villages in europe. killed or maimed more than a million soldiers and civilians, and bankrupted a dozen nations including england and france. remember, it started in britain's north american colonies, and the british government and british people naturally thought british subjects in british north america should share the costs of the war with their fellow citizens in britain. in fact, the government raised property taxes so high in britain that farmers rioted in protest and demanded that americans pay their fair share of the war. in 17 # 64, the british government extended to the colonies a stamp tax that everyone in britain had been paying for more than 70 years. it amounted to next to nothing for the average citizen, a pepny or two or a stamp attached to legal documents, publications, and the packages of non-essential products like playing cards. the harshest effects of this tax, however, were on members of three powerful special in
ownership. look at europe and the rest of the world. we are way, way out there. we have the highest murder rate in the world. >> abbey, here is what they say to me. each time it is the same debate and nothing gets done about it. 300 million guns and you have between 11 and 12,000 guns and murders a year. britain has 35 as does germany and australia. to countries that have strict gun kcontrol have little gun murder. i think carole had it right. she said it is about personal responsibility. that is the most important part. it is a difficult one. people are going to have an oh w pinion about it. we have to make sure that they were -- wanted the american people to feel protected about the british at the time. i don't think people should be able to go online and buy guns. there should be rules in place on background checks. our country is founded on these freedoms. i totally respect the constitution by the way. what i don't respect is what i don't respect is the interpretation of the letter of the second amendment of the constitution which i think is being misused to endorse everyone in america
't export to europe. but instead of talking about that, he lashed out an audience that was almost all jewish, he lashed out on him and he said you are a must stop making interest of the lead to a hitler from the great dictator, as he stopped making and a german, and i hit local antinazi films, you are going to cause the next war millions of american boys aren't bickel and blood will be spilled and will be the worst outbreak of anti-semitism that this world has ever seen because everybody is going to win a remedy in this country is going to blame the jews. by 1940 he was a total absolute praia nobody wanted to touch him. nobody could join the first immunity and sign up with lynn burba but he didn't want to do that because he knew that if he did that, there would be no place in politics for his children ever, ever, ever. so he didn't. he stayed quiet. the marrec was part of the stories, the part i'm not going to be able to tell you the you will have to read in 1940 he was the kennedy name was dirty. it was dirt among the isolationists because kennedy didn't come out against roosevelt. again be
's largest trading partner, europe's economy remains on prepares you footing despite several months of relative calm and there's a growing debate abt whher e u.k should lead the e.u. earlier this month we covered the "economist" magazine read "good-bye europe, look what happened when britain left the e.u. " i'm pleased to have george osborne back on this program and back at this table. >> thank you very much. >> rose: you're in new york city for a speech at the manhattan institute. >> i did that last night and had some meetings on wall street, seeing them there later. >> rose: so what's your message about the british economy to manhattan institute as well as the mayor and wall street? >> well, the basic message is itaiis on for business. if you want to come and invest in a country that is dealing with its problems, cutting its business taxes, providing opportunities for companys to go britain is the place. i think we're doing better. >> rose: you do? >> i certainly do. >> rose: the numbers don't look like that. >> well, actually, look at the u.k. compared to many western economies,
is for our nation unexplored and unperilous territory. europe is experiencing that and the results are not attractive. it seems that when a majority of people internalize the big bang theory and ask with peggy lee is that all there is, when many people decide the universe is the result of a cosmic sneeze with no meaning, when they conclude that therefore life should be filled, overflowing with distractions, comforts and entertainments to assuage the board m, then they may become susceptible to the excitements of politics that promise assets meaning and spurs alleviations of a human condition berefts and therefore barren. we know from bitter experience of blood soaked 20th century the political consequences of this if it's meaninglessness. political nature of who are vacuum and a vacuum of meaning is filled by secular fighting faiths. fascism gave its adherence a meaningful life. communism taught it's adherence to derive meaning from the participation in the drama of history's unfolding destiny. the political paradox is this, secularism advanced in part as moral revolution against
we gone bankrupt last year, europe would have ended. so they sent in monty to manage the situation in order for the german and french banks to get their money back. the ucb printed out -- ecb print out money used to help our banks but do not use it to finance our businesses. they give it to them buy to see buy back their debt to help french and german banks. that was monty's work. and in the meantime, our debt went up. >> reporter: and by the way, the five-star movement is number two in the polls. but he's not really a politician. he is a comedian. not kidding. he actually is a comedian. we also managed to catch up with the politician who's more serious about becoming the next prime minister, who has 30% of the votes in the latest polls, his name is mr. bercani. you know him. we'll show you that in the next hour. now it is time for your "global markets report." >>> all right. thank you very much. we are slightly weighted to the upside here. the european equity grind-up rally continues. advances outpaced decliners about 5-4. the dow jones 600, the ftse flat up three points. the dax
of films. the film come is going to do if they could export to europe. but instead of talking about that, she lashed out at an audience that is almost all jewish. he lashed out at them and say stop making anti-hitler films. unless you stop taking anti-german, anti-hitler, anti-nazi films, you're going to cause the next work. boys are going to be killed, blood will be spilled and there'll be the worst outbreak of anti-semitism in this world ever seen because everybody is going to blame everybody in this country is going to blame the jew's. by 1940, he was a total absolute pariah. nobody wanted to touch him. if you wanted, he could have a chilling the america first community, signed up with lindbergh. but he didn't want to do that because he knew if he did that there'd be no place in politics for his children at her,, ever. so he stayed quiet. there are actually as part of the story is the part that i'm not going to be that tell you, that you're going to have to read. [laughter] in 1940, he was a kennedy name is in the dirt. it is dirt among the isolationists for kennedy to comment against
ronald reagan's decision in 1983 to station medium-range misfiles in europe to counter the soviet buildup of similar misfiles on its side of the dividing line between its domain and the west. massive protests were planned here at home and all over the world with the biggest one scheduled for the aid to which over a million people from every country in western europe was streaming by plane, bus, and on foot. the cover of the dutch broadcasters had erected a respite overlooking the square to which the protesters were all marching. they invited pundits from various european countries to sit there and comment on this great event. evidently, however, there were unable to find anyone in the whole of europe willing or able to support reagan's decision, which is why i received a panicky call at the last minute, inviting me to participate. so desperate were they test bicep their decision -- their discussion with an affirmative action fascist, role i often played in the days, that they even offered to fly me over on the monstrously expensive concord. and so came about that a few hours later i found
is gloria. i come from europe. everybody talks about [indiscernible] most of us [indiscernible] we are the only ones that can produce babies. i was wondering with the crazy schedule you mentioned working until midnight how you balance family time and a career. the mother is the most important role in the family and for the child. the child is the future of everything we're talking about. how can a woman in the united states be independent with a career if she has had a child with no maternity leave? united states is way behind most other countries. they have maternity leave. there should not be fair when she goes to an interview -- there should not be fear when going to an interview. >> does anyone want to take that? >> i would be happy to do that. >> i have always gotten up at 4:30 or 5:00. i have a son. he is grown of now. when i get up, he is off living his life. my husband and i have always been in similar careers. that really helps a lot. over the years, i made choices on what i would do in order to create the flexibility for me to raise our son. i do think that is very import
of the army? >> they are roughly 123,000 total. but pago is roughly the size of western europe. there are about 6000 deployed. no, that is the minusco, 6000 deployed in the east purdum i do not know the exact number of the congolese military in the east because it is a vast amount of area they are trying to cover with military troops. >> why is this such a big issue for the drc in order to be able to basically prevail in this situation? >> a slight provision -- revision. i think probably today, the m23 probably has up to 2000 troops. the sign -- i think he has pointed out the size of the congo, but i think it is important to graphically described the congo as a country that is as large as the eastern part of the united states from the atlantic to the mississippi. it is an enormous country, and since the split of sudan, it is geographically the largest in africa. the eastern congo is one of the most of a cold areas in which to operate -- one of the most difficult areas in which to operate. it is deeply for arrested in some places. and in -- is deeply forested. in some cases, a d
and the greenback. and boasted in one day she made $200,000 europe was booming minks were giving easy money at low interest rate and prices were rising and they were buying the bonds because they pay high interest rates. but the prices are so high they reached a level where nobody could afford them they could not buy the bonds of day with some of them. 80 percent was on by the europeans. then they went into bankruptcy and the bank had to close. know more customers for the railroad bond edberg and hetty had to come back to america. this city had burgeoned with tense story buildings central part stretch north and a brownstone houses replaced the shanties and apartment houses appeared for the first time. the largest bookstore in the world, patrick's touched this guy the metropolitan museum of art opened in the museum of natural history. the exuberant spending was no different from the unfettered expansion from industrial on to procurers, promoters and real estate speculators. from 1873 the financial panic flat and the country into despair. does that sound familiar? and the stocks bounced up and down.
in europe in june 1940? >> the war had started in september 1939, peter, and germany had overrun poland. hitler's idea at this point was to invade france and knock britain out of the war thereby. with the intent later on to invade the soviet union. he hated communism. this is one thing that was really part of his agenda. he was actually going to invade france in the wintertime, ma in november-december. he had to put that off because -- spent of 1939? >> of 1939. because of the invasion plans fell into the hands of the french and the british, soy put off the invasion until may, and he came up with a new plan. the old plant actually had been similar to world war i. it was going to come through belgium, along the channel coast, and down into paris. but he had to completely rearrange that, and he came up with you do, one of his generals, to think through belgium, but send the majority of these armored power through the our danforth further south and coming behind any french and british armies that went into belgium once the war started. and this worked perfectly, beginning may 10 of 1940»
, a message of hope to occupied europe and of course in 1940 and 1941 an a meal for great support for the united states. >> give us the tool and we will finish the job. >> one of my favorite documents within the exhi business, churchill was in new york in december 1931. and was knocked down by a motorcar on fifth avenue at 76th street. and it was the classic mistake of the brit in america and he got out of his taxic-- taxi, looked the wrong way and was immediately hit by a car going the other direction. what he did was two things. he wrote an article on what it was like to be hit by a motorcar. but he also managed to persuade his doctor in prohibition era new york to write him a prescription necessitating the use of alcohol at all meals. >> rose: joining me now is celia sandys, winston churchill's granddaughter, david reynold-- renolds of cambridge university, peter clarke on the recently published mr. churchill's profession and i am pleased to have all of them here at this table. thank you. >> rose: i so looked forward to this i was go-going to tell a story that i once went to se
companies going to do if they couldn't export, right, to europe? but instead of talking about that, he lashed out at an audience that was almost all jewish. he lashed out at them, and he said you guys unless you stop making anti-hitler films, the great dictator -- charlie chaplin's great dictator -- unless you stop making anti-german, anti-hitler, anti-nazi films, you are going to cause the next war. millions of american boys are going to be killed, blood will be spilled, and there will be the worst outbreak of anti-semitism this world has ever seen because everybody is going to blame everybody in this country is going to blame the jews. by 1940 he was a total, absolute pariah. nobody wanted to touch him. if he had wanted, he could have joined the american first community, you know, and signed up with lindbergh with, but he didn't want to do that, because he knew if he did that, there'd be no place in politics for his children ever, ever, ever. so he didn't. he stayed quiet. the miraculous part of the story is the part that i'm not going to be able to tell you, that you're going to hav
going flat in europe. with the continent's ongoing economic problems give them not a lot of reasons to pop open the bottles. >> open the prosecco. it's ten bucks a bottle and tastes almost the same. >>> when we come back, new threats against americans from one of al qaeda's most ruthless branches. >>> who is rolling into the playoffs in the nfl? stay with us to find out. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ [ female announcer ] nothing gets you going quite like the power of quaker oats. today is going to be epic. quaker up. [ woman ] too weak. wears off. been there. tried that. ladybug body milk? no thanks. [ female announcer ] stop searching and start repairing. eucerin professional repair moisturizes while actually repairing very dry skin. it's so powerful you can skip a day... but light enough you won't want to. dermatologist recommended eucerin. the end of trial and error has arrived. try a free sample at eucerinus.com. you're always on, so we're always ready. tyson grilled & ready chicken. no preservatives, 98% fat free, and fully cooked. we'll take care of dinner, you take care of everything e
back that he had borrowed from his uncle and walked on foot from eastern europe, he made his way to england where he had a relative, an uncle and he scraped together enough money to get steerage on the bottom of a boat to canada and then walked from labrador to new york city and then worked in a glove factory and became a glove salesman. quite a successful glove salesman until about age 30 discovered the early movies and said that's the future and changed businesses. >> joy: it is an unbelievable story. all of those guys have stories like that. people should look up stuff like that. find out. >> it was an empire of their own. all of the jews in hollywood. all of those guys who started the industry were from within several hundred dollar mile radius in eastern europe. >> joy: they didn't speak english. they were all poor. they were desperately poor really. to walk that kind of -- i can't even do my 10,000 steps a day. imagine walking from where he walked. it is just fascinating stuff that people should look
the intellectual life and breakthroughs of the enlightenment in europe and scotland and apply them in many ways to american politics. self-government was only going to work in jefferson's mind if the people who were governing themselves knew themselves, cared about each other because why would you sacrifice with someone for whom you had no common interest, and you could find that your individual rights and your individual being had come from nature or god and therefore couldn't be taking away from the hand of a king or the hands of a mob in the this is the moment that he embodies. its hierarchical moment to be alive in that very hour, a hugely important so here you have jefferson who could kill a fly when he needs to and who could think of the most fundamental way when he needs to. one hell of a combination. what i wanted to do in revisiting jefferson obviously was try to restore him to his context as a politician partly because i think politics gets too bad of a wrap these days. it may deserve a city bad rap but i don't want to be overly optimistic. we don't have any other way to govern oursel
of diplomacy helped broker a cease-fire. number three, in europe greece was the problem child that spent too much, save nothing and threatened to take down the euro. new leadership didn't stop constant violent protests, staged by those facing loss of jobs, pay cuts, higher taxes as their weary government begs for more cash. europe's leaders including the new french president committed to save the euro. it lives on, but for how long? number two. the deadliest month to date as the assad regime intensified its use of air power. >> one of the questions most asked in 2012, was how much longer can this man hold on to power? assad was under intense pressure to step down. but his regime stepped up the fire power against the opposition. civilians caught in the crossfire. more than 40,000 people have died so far. >> this is, yet, another bread line. >> the opposition fights on making more dramatic gains than ever and gaining pledges of additional support for the international community. number one -- she fought back from the brink of death after being attacked on a school bus. the taliban shocked. she
unexplored and unperilous territory. europe is experiencing that and the results are not attractive. it seems that when a majority of people internalize the big bang theory and ask with peggy lee is that all there is, when many people decide the universe is the result of a cosmic sneeze with no meaning, when they conclude that therefore life should be filled, overflowing with distractions, comforts and entertainments to aswage the board m, then they may become suss september bling to the excitements of politics that promise ar sets meaning and spures al vations of a human condition berefts and therefore barren. we know from bitter experience of blood soaked 20th century the political consequences of this filt meaninginglessness. political nature of who are vacuum and a vacuum of meaning is filled by sec cue lar fighting faiths. fascism gave its adherence a meaningful life. communism taught it's adherence to dwive meaning from the participation in the drama of history's unfolding destiny. the political paradox is this, secularism advanced in part as moral revotion against the history of religi
't forget cnbc has extended coverage today in europe for that bank of england rate decision. that's at 12:00 london time. >>> apple mad its worst stock drop in four years and we see their market share in china declining, as well. is this reason for investors to lose their appetite for the tech darling. having you ship my gifts couldn't be easier. well, having a ton of locations doesn't hurt. and a santa to boot! [ chuckles ] right, baby. oh, sir. that is a customer. oh...sorry about that. [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. fedex office. yep. the longer you stay with us, the more you save. and when you switch from another company to us, we even reward you for the time you spent there. genius. yeah, genius. you guys must have your own loyalty program, right? well, we have something. show her, tom. huh? you should see november! oh, yeah? giving you more. now that's progressive. call or click today. >>> timothy geithner says the white house is ready to go over the fiscal cliff if tax rates on the wealthiest don't rise. investors looking for ecb guidance when draghi announces th
in europe, greece was the problem child that spent too much, saved nothing and threatened to take down the euro. new leadership, pay cuts, higher taxes as their weary government begs for more cash. committing to save the euro. it lives on, but for how long? >> the deadliest month to date as the assad regime intensified its air power. >> how much longer can this man hold on to power? bashar al assad was under even more intense pressure to step down but his regime stepped up the fire power against the opposition, civilians caught in the crossfire, more than 40,000 people have died so far. >> reporter: this is yet another bread line. >> the opposition fights on, making more dramatic gains than ever and gaining pledges of support from the international community. number one, she fought back from the brink of death after being attacked on a school bus. the taliban shot malala yousafzai. she survived, wake up in a british hospital and, according to her father, immediately asked for her school books. the world was gripped, moved and inspired by the story of one determined young girl facing do
this time on the southern coast of the mediterranean, it's very clear that europe will be vulnerable and indeed we will be worldwide, so it seems to me this is something that we should be involved in, but our friends in europe really have a lot at stake here, too. >> ambassador, we want to also ask you tonight about former vice-president dick cheney's latest remarks. now, last night he blasted president obama's foreign policy in the middle east. here's what he said in part. >> i think certainly in my conversations with many of those people, they no longer believe us. they no longer trust us. they no longer believe they can count on the united states of america to do what we did 20 years ago. our allies no longer trust us or have confidence in us and our adversaries no longer fear us. the president can make bold statement and bold talk as he did in the last couple of days but development in syria, but i don't think they care. > >> greta: ambassador, what do you think about the former vice-president's mark? >> sadly, i think he's on target. i don't think the administration has credibil
people born into bondage and server to today and the victim of sex trafficking in western europe sold for $10 or more. these are the averages. the immediate economic consequence of this depreciation and cost is an increase in return on investment. particularly when tied to the fact you can exploit people in dozens of injuries. in the old law, roughly 20% average annual return on investment. today, 300% sein or more. but sex trafficking, it is more than that -- today, 300% or more. with sex trafficking, it is more than that. today, it could be a year or a couple of years. it is much shorter. centuries ago, you could legally own human beings. today you cannot actually legally own human beings. but people tend to exact the same kind of exploitation regardless. i have already used a lot of terms and had not really told you what they mean. the reason for that is some of these terms, most of them remain unclear. there is debate whether you talk to prosecutors, law enforcement, people in the international arena, as to what slavery means and forced labor and him and trafficking. it depends on
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 120 (some duplicates have been removed)